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https://youtu.be/3iNGWswJVko

First camera is towards my right cheek, second camera is on my swing arm. It was experimental but I liked how it turned out. I'm learning the Loudon Speedway track here with Instructor Tim in the red vest. He takes me around for a warm up lap, shows me the lines on the second, and I try it out for the third. When he's going it's hard to keep up with him, what a smooth guy.
 

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Haven't been on the track since April and I can't wait to get back out there! I learn a lot every time I'm on the track and have a few key notes I'd like to put to practice next time I'm out there (must get faster!) This is at Chuckwalla Valley Raceway in Southern California
http://youtu.be/d0KgA5eg2LA
 

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Here's one lap from my last track day at the Utah Motorsports Complex (UMC) on Oct 15, 2016. I was able to get in five track days this year running on the East, West and Perimeter courses, my goal was two to three. Looking forward to next year. The suspension is set-up for the street so it's kinda soft, will work on getting a setting for the track next year. My goal this year were to be safe and smooth with all of the inputs and body movements ... velocity can come later.

 

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Some great footage here. When I'm building a video for a client, here are the few things I focus on:

1 - Shoot everything. Do a time lapse of setup/registration. Walk-up 20-second interviews. Dogs, if there are any there. People. The empty track. EVERYTHING. The more footage you have, the more variety you'll have when you. . .

2 - Cut 99% of it. Watch all the footage, take good notes (time-stamps are the way to, a la "Clip GP0001, 10:43, front end slide," etc), and see if there's an easy story to tell, ie "I was really nervous and sketched out, but then got quicker and had a lot of fun" or "I was riding awesome and then I crashed and it sucked."

3 - No, seriously. Cut almost everything. Reduce the track sessions to the shortest clips you can (and still show the highlight). Even dedicated track fans don't have the attention span to watch a 30 minute video wherein 20 minutes of it is you entering/exiting the track and warmup laps with your hand on your hip.

4 - Music. It's easy to add, and gives the video some perspective and texture. Also, most songs are about 3-5 minutes long, which I've found is the sweet spot for this stuff. Fight the urge to do a 2-song video; nobody has the patience for it.

5- Do a lead in and lead out sequence. Find a way to introduce yourself, the bike, the track, etc etc. It doesn't have to be a movie-style credits crawl, but frame-up/bookend the video part with something.

If you're shooting footage for yourself (to study and get faster, etc), ignore all this. But, if you want people to actually watch your stuff when you post it on line, these ideas are a decent place to start.

Cheers,
E
 
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