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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I like to apologise , as I don't really have any idea how to set up suspension, so looking for a few pointers. I don't want to aimlessly adjust things as I know I could make things a whole lot worse.

I find my bike a bit hard not the bikes fault, but the awful British roads , they are so full of bumps,
what is the best way to soften up the ride, so I don't get thrown out of the saddle.
I'm 5 11" and 12 stone if that helps

Thanks in advance
 

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First, I would say if you have a shop in your area who are suspension experts, that's by far your best bet. But if not, here's some info to get started for a weekend experiment. The spring rates shouldn't be too far off from you at ~170 lbs. (12 stone) so first thing to do is get the spring preload set correctly (aka. "Set the sag"). If you don't know how to do that, just go to YouTube and search on "setting sag" and you'll find lots of help. You'll need two helpers and a measuring tape. For general street riding, aim for about 40-45mm of sag in the front, 35-40mm in the rear. Don't worry about setting the free sag (just the weight of the bike) just go straight to setting the sag with you sitting on the bike and get it in the range I specified above. We'd run less for the track, but for the street that should be good. Once you have the sag set, go for a ride. If you took some preload off from the stock settings you might find that this improves the ride already, if you didn't change the preload much then you might not notice. Next if the bike is still feeling stiff, you need to determine if it's the front, back or both that are feeling stiff. Go for your ride, over some bumps, and try to pay attention to the sensation you get through the handlebars and through the seat. When you hit a bump, are you feeling it harshly in your hands, your bum, or both? Only adjust the end of the bike that is causing problems, or both if both are causing problems. Start by removing 3 clicks of both rebound damping and compression damping. Go for a ride again, if it's better, stick with it. If it's still harsh, take 3 more clicks out. If still hard, try one more round of 3 clicks out, but don't go any farther than that. Ideally we'd be trying to balance the rebound damping to the spring preload, and then tuning compression based upon travel used and rider feedback, but that's a more advanced topic best done by a suspension tuner who's got hands on the bike.
 

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First off I like to apologise , as I don't really have any idea how to set up suspension, so looking for a few pointers. I don't want to aimlessly adjust things as I know I could make things a whole lot worse.

I find my bike a bit hard not the bikes fault, but the awful British roads , they are so full of bumps,
what is the best way to soften up the ride, so I don't get thrown out of the saddle.
I'm 5 11" and 12 stone if that helps

Thanks in advance
Darren at MCT Suspension will sort all your suspension problems. He has found an issue with the damping with the standard rear shock which he modifies and this transforms the handling on the Panigale's.
 

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Darren at MCT Suspension will sort all your suspension problems. He has found an issue with the damping with the standard rear shock which he modifies and this transforms the handling on the Panigale's.
Well Darren and the team at MCT have done my shock which should be back with me tomorrow. I've done 500 miles on the std shock and IMHO it's crap. Bucks me out of the seat on even fairly minor bumps. Was thinking I'd have to go Ohlins which seems wrong. Seems like the std shock can be sorted.
Find out this weekend if the sun comes out.
 

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id agree with everyone and start by setting the sag

but being a performance oriented motorcycle - you aren't going to get any real comfort when going over rough roads.
 

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Shock turned up today as promised by MCT. Fitted tonight. Just waiting for Saturday sunshine to try it out. :cool:
How is it?
 

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the german PS magazine did a comparisan 899 vs. GSXR-750 and tested the bike on the road and on the track.

they published a setup which I (5 ft 7 in, 12 stone) found very useful on the road:

front fork:
static negative spring deflection: 36 mm
compression stroke: 7 turns open (stock: 7 tunrs open)
decompression stroke: 6 turns open (stock: 5 turns open)
no further changes

rear shock:
static negative spring deflection: 13 mm
compression stroke low: completly open (stock: 3,5 turns open)
decompression stroke: 13 clicks open (stock: 15 clicks open)
no further changes
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
the german PS magazine did a comparisan 899 vs. GSXR-750 and tested the bike on the road and on the track.

they published a setup which I (5 ft 7 in, 12 stone) found very useful on the road:

front fork:
static negative spring deflection: 36 mm
compression stroke: 7 turns open (stock: 7 tunrs open)
decompression stroke: 6 turns open (stock: 5 turns open)
no further changes

rear shock:
static negative spring deflection: 13 mm
compression stroke low: completly open (stock: 3,5 turns open)
decompression stroke: 13 clicks open (stock: 15 clicks open)
no further changes
Being that I'm a complete novice (some might say tool)at this sort of thing
That might as well be in Latin lol
 
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