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Are clutches pretty complicated to install?

I always find that vehicles are a lot simpler than they appear, but clutches are one thing I haven't dared touch
 

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Motorcycle clutches are FAR easier to install than car clutches. Especially on all wheel drives, ugh. I blew the clutch on my Evo and it cost me an arm and a leg. Would have done it myself but it required so many special tools it just wasn't feasible. On a bike it's exposed on the right side when you take the cover off so it's not bad at all.
 

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What about a dry clutch? I imagine its no different than in earlier models that came with wet clutches?
 

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EBC and slipper clutch are compatible. Installed a clutch is not difficult as far as mechanical operations go on a bike, but if you don't have the clutch basket holding tool to use when torquing down the retaining nut to a very high torque, it's very difficult. My advice would be to have your dealer do it, you don't want to screw up a clutch install and have it come loose and destroy your engine cases.
 

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EBC and slipper clutch are compatible. Installed a clutch is not difficult as far as mechanical operations go on a bike, but if you don't have the clutch basket holding tool to use when torquing down the retaining nut to a very high torque, it's very difficult. My advice would be to have your dealer do it, you don't want to screw up a clutch install and have it come loose and destroy your engine cases.
No matter how easy you think it might be, if it could impact the warranty, have the dealer do it. It will save you in $$$ and headaches if something goes wrong.

Even if it winds up being covered after a battle with DNA, you can still be out time and expense with no bike to ride while it is being resolved. Just isn't worth it in my opinion. It isn't like you just bought a CBR or R6 (no offense) so wait 2 extra weeks until you can afford the shop time as well and let them do it right.

If you have to ask, "how hard is it..." then don't 'try' it yourself unless you pick up a wrecked track / project bike that won't sideline you if you screw up.
 
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what's amazing is that you can videos of "how to's" for just about everything in the world (which is usually how I determine if i'm going to give something a go or not, if I don't know how to do it, along with forum how to's) But there's almost nothing out there for the 899 since the bike is so new. Maybe there's more stuff for the 1199.

but yeah, I know my limits...and actually feel more comfortable with rebuilding an engine than a clutch. My TT QR transmission shift fork went...$2,600 bill...
 

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True, but as you are already aware, not only is the how to knowledge important, but the list of proprietary tools required is long and expensive.

Plus it would take most people three times longer to learn with a video without direct instruction and then twice as much longer than a trained tech to perform the job.

When I add it all up compared to my hourly wage, I find it hard to justify trying the work myself. I would rather it be in the shop being fixed while I am at work and riding it during my time off, than using that time fixing it and then having to go back to my day job.
 

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Yes install a slipper clutch! It will be one of the best investments you'll make! Well, depending on what type of riding you do, but when I took my panigale out to track, I would come in hot in the corners and I'll try to down shift and of course the rear locks and comes up which throws me off before entering the corner. With the slipper clutch you don't have to worry about it happening. I guess you can say it's like rev matching so your rear wheel doesn't wanna lock up
 

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Well, depending on what type of riding you do, but when I took my panigale out to track, I would come in hot in the corners and I'll try to down shift and of course the rear locks and comes up which throws me off before entering the corner.
Really? I was downshifting my bike really aggressively on track and I couldn't get the rear end to get crazy. I figured the EBC must just work really well. I considered getting a slipper at some point, but it just doesn't seem to need it. How many gears were you coming down, and were you blipping the throttle at all?
 

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There are WAY too many variables in this to make a valid comparison from one rider/bike to another. Everyone's riding style, skill, conditions, etc are different. The bottom line is that if YOU are downshifting and finding that your rear tire is chirping/skipping around then YOU need a slipper clutch! EBC is NOT designed to prevent this, EBC does not function the same as a slipper clutch. EBC is designed to reduce engine drag on corner entry to speed up your corner entry speeds, it's a racing technology that has trickled down from the World Superbike program, it's NOT designed to be a "safety" device to prevent the negative effects of ham-fisted downshifting.
 

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I understand that. I've never owned a bike that had a slipper, so perhaps I'm just overly careful on how hard I downshift and what I'm doing with my throttle. All I know is this bike feels more stable during hard downshifting and braking than my previous bikes.
 

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Is Ducati's "APTC wet clutch" that they use on the Monster and Hypermotard different from the 899's?

The APTC ‘wet’ clutch gives a ‘slipper’ type action that prevents destabilizing of the rear-end under aggressive down-shifting and also gives the extra benefit of a super-light feel at the lever, a great benefit in stop-start city traffic or during longer journeys. The 21-plate oil-bath clutch (11 friction and 10 steel) represents a power-enhancing weight reduction over the ‘dry’ system as well as having a quieter operation and requiring less maintenance.
Ducati APTC clutch
 

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Is Ducati's "APTC wet clutch" that they use on the Monster and Hypermotard different from the 899's?



Ducati APTC clutch
Yes, the APTC is a sort of "slipper" clutch, it actually slips on back torque and screws itself together on forward torque, which is how they're able to get away with running lighter clutch springs in those bikes to make the lever effort lighter. It's similar to what's in the 1199, but that one is a higher-end spec that what is in the Monster & Hyper.
 

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EBC and slipper clutch are compatible. Installed a clutch is not difficult as far as mechanical operations go on a bike, but if you don't have the clutch basket holding tool to use when torquing down the retaining nut to a very high torque, it's very difficult. My advice would be to have your dealer do it, you don't want to screw up a clutch install and have it come loose and destroy your engine cases.
I've always just used an air impact wrench on the center nut. On/off. Never had a problem with one backing out. I tried a clutch basket tool, but those things blow. Everything else is a simple plug and play. Especially since you're using the stock plates/pack (with the Yoyo and stock 1199 slipper).

My 2 cents,

B
 

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I've always just used an air impact wrench on the center nut. On/off. Never had a problem with one backing out. I tried a clutch basket tool, but those things blow. Everything else is a simple plug and play. Especially since you're using the stock plates/pack (with the Yoyo and stock 1199 slipper).

My 2 cents,

B
I can't endorse that approach, seen to many baskets come loose over the years from not being torqued properly, including my own from doing exactly as you described on my old Monster 900! ;)
 
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