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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i just recently picked up a ‘14 899 (my first ducati) and so far love it i haven’t been able to ride it a much yet just a few blocks before putting it away til the spring time however one thing i noticed is that when i just needed to walk it or do a simple repositioning of the bike while the bike is off but in gear and the clutch fully pulled in, i feel a lot of resistance, instead of it feeling the same as if it were in neutral ( it moves/ rolls perfectly normal in meutral)which i feel is pretty odd, i read online where others have also mentioned feeling the same or similar thing, is this normal for panigale’s? Its not like its completely immovable its just that i gotta really exert myself to get it to roll forward or back…very odd especially compared to say my last bike or any bike ive had or ridden before
 

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A bit of drag is normal on any bike, especially when the engine is cold. I don't recall the 899 to be worse than other bikes, but to be honest I almost never move a bike in gear with the engine off.
The first thing I would check is whether the previous owner kept the clutch lever very close to the grip (small hands), as that would limit its travel. Second, I would do a proper test, with the bike on a level surface and the engine fully warmed up: fully pull the clutch, put the bike in first gear and release the brakes: does it try to move forward? If not, I'd say you're ok. If it does, start by doing a clutch bleed, just to make sure there is no air in the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah could be that i just need to get used to Duactis ,coming from all Japenese bikes before this purchase…
Hmm i wouldnt imagine the position of the clutch lever would have an affect on that but ill play wit that and see if these any difference even at its closest theres plen. Ill see if it does want to move forward on its own and see if it is a clutch bleed thing.

Cheers
 

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Keeping a lever close to the grip limits its travel, reducing the separation between clutch plates when the lever is fully pulled. The same is true if you have air in the system, as some of the lever's travel is wasted to compress the air instead of moving the clutch. Add a cold engine, and you end up with some noticeable drag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Keeping a lever close to the grip limits its travel, reducing the separation between clutch plates when the lever is fully pulled. The same is true if you have air in the system, as some of the lever's travel is wasted to compress the air instead of moving the clutch. Add a cold engine, and you end up with some noticeable drag.
Ok gotcha , makes sense (y)

Keeping a lever close to the grip limits its travel, reducing the separation between clutch plates when the lever is fully pulled. The same is true if you have air in the system, as some of the lever's travel is wasted to compress the air instead of moving the clutch. Add a cold engine, and you end up with some noticeable drag.
Ok gotcha yep makes sense
 
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