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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I have confessed before, the only motorcycles I rode before were 100-150 cc bikes,now jumped straight to Panigale 899. The argument for myself was to keep it in wet mode, with only 100hp and weight being only slightly more than my prior bikes , the ride should be manageable. However that ended quickly....
First off, this thing is LOUD and HOT. Even on wet mode you know you are sitting on a monster and pretending it's a tame pony. Anywho the first few miles in wet mode, I thought I'm ready for more...
Switch to sports mode. Pushed in new ear plugs and ready again. This time the damage to my ears was far less and got to experience where all the money I paid for went into. Don't think I have ever been in anything that shoots from 60 to 90 in the blink of an eye with the throttle only half open.
Questions-
1. How many miles do I have AFTER the low fuel light comes on and the display starts counting miles upwards from that point. The light came on both days.????

2. Haven't had done any "leaning" in corners that this bike is built for. So far have been only slowing down enough that I don't have to lean much. So far 180 miles on the bike. Should I try to get more miles before I start trying to corner like it's supposed to?

3. Is ok to install cell phone holder on the steering stabilizer? I need my cell phone GPS for directions.
 

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My one and only single advice i can give you is, take advanced motorcycle lessons. Try California Superbike School out. Cause it sounds like you need to learn "leaning" aka cornering skills.

As for Q1. Cant help there as alot of us are trying to figure that out as well. The light seems to come on whenever it wants too. I'm sure some US residents can give you a rough amount of miles per tank.

Q2. Take a advanced riding course.

Q3. I think it should be ok to install on the damper. But id probably find a mount for the triple clamp instead.
 

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First priority invest in good gear, 2nd is invest in your riding skills. You'll thank yourself for it in the long run.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. Makes a lot of sense. I will try to find dates for advanced motorcycle lessons around here. I don't live in the areas where California Superbike School offers lessons. If I don't feel confident enough, might even go one of these locations during my downtime.
 

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I suggest taking one of those basic motorcycle courses. If your not familiar with counter steering that's where I'd start. It can never hurt to refresh all your skills in a controlled environment.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have done the basic motorcycle course. The counter steering part i.e the drill where you do a figure of 8 in a tight space at slow speeds, I'm a pro at that, only because of weaving through choke a block traffic for 10 years on 100-150 cc bikes.
The cornering exercise in basic motorcycle course was at low speeds too but still wasn't very confident. So I don't trust myself to do it at high speeds at all. The speeds that are required to do the "lean".
As far as gear goes, Already have a DOT certified full face helmet, but still shopping for a lighter one, something like carbon fiber ones, because of neck pain on long rides. Ducati jacket / gloves made by Rev-it. Still shopping for a riding shoes , something I can still keep on when I ride to work. Any suggestions are welcome. Also welcome are thoughts on body armor. Is that recommended also?
 

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Your jacket probably has a zip in pocket in the back that will hold a back protector. I like this way, because I put it in there and never have to remember it again. I'd also recommend full boots for your ride to work, just throw some more comfortable shoes in a back pack, assuming that's a viable option at your workplace.
 

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Still shopping for a riding shoes , something I can still keep on when I ride to work. Any suggestions are welcome. Also welcome are thoughts on body armor. Is that recommended also?
For boots i recommend the Alpinestars Supertech R Boots, they are very comfortable when riding and walking around town in. They have an inner shoe which is removable for washing (like snowboard boots). They are pricey but easily one of the best boots out there and last a long time.

Helments. Well i use the Shoei GT-Air and its a pretty light helmet. I have no neck issues what so ever with it.

Gloves, look for gloves with knuckle protectors and guards to protect your pinky finger (is that a thing, small finger whatever) as well has a grip on the palm. All come down to your budget.

Jacket, i use an Dainese Delmar Jacket for commuting, has titanium shoulder guards (which work very well and saved my shoulder from being shattered in a high side). Also has a slot for a back protector (highly recommend one), hump on the back to protect your neck in an accident and armour in the arms and elbows.

Give us an idea of what your looking to spend on each item and im sure the members on this forum can point you in the right direction.
 

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I have done the basic motorcycle course. The counter steering part i.e the drill where you do a figure of 8 in a tight space at slow speeds, I'm a pro at that, only because of weaving through choke a block traffic for 10 years on 100-150 cc bikes.
The cornering exercise in basic motorcycle course was at low speeds too but still wasn't very confident. So I don't trust myself to do it at high speeds at all. The speeds that are required to do the "lean".
As far as gear goes, Already have a DOT certified full face helmet, but still shopping for a lighter one, something like carbon fiber ones, because of neck pain on long rides. Ducati jacket / gloves made by Rev-it. Still shopping for a riding shoes , something I can still keep on when I ride to work. Any suggestions are welcome. Also welcome are thoughts on body armor. Is that recommended also?
Counter steering only works at higher speeds like 20 mph on up. Push the bar right to lean right and push left to lean left. If you just look through the corner on the inside line. The bike will turn like magic.

I ride with all my gear all the time. Just never know when some idiot is going to put you on the ground.
 

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I'd like to chime in on the "take driving lessons advice". I've been riding for 12 years and I'm still learning. I watch this video at least a couple of times a year and I still find new things to practice on. You'll find a lot of good knowledge to keep in mind.

Twist of the wrist II by Keith Code, founder of California Superbike School.
 

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I'd like to chime in on the "take driving lessons advice". I've been riding for 12 years and I'm still learning. I watch this video at least a couple of times a year and I still find new things to practice on. You'll find a lot of good knowledge to keep in mind.

Twist of the wrist II by Keith Code, founder of California Superbike School.
Twist of the Wrist II - YouTube
Great video, never seen it, as always it helps to watch video's like this. I can see myself coming back to it often.
 

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A superbike without knowledge of leaning? :confused:

Interesting...like a Ferrari without knowing how to back out of a parking space?

Invest in some serious online research like Twist II and some additional reading on body positioning, throttle while leaning, and how to avoid fear responses...Good luck
 

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My '09 848 was my first superbike :D I was 29 and hadn't ridden since I was 15 in 1995. I started off on Yamaha Jog scooters and went onto a Katana and a CBR before taking the long hiatus.

Don't be afraid to go fast and lean the bike in the turns, as mentioned, you push right to go left and vice versa at speed.

I have both of Keith Code's videos along with a suspension setup walk-thru video.

Since you already did the MST and have your full license, I would sign up for a riding school where you can use one of their bikes, typically a GSXR or a Ninja. Then you won't be worried about going down on your new 899.

Personally I've never done a formal class or weekend school. It comes quite naturally to me. I do plan on doing one though just to get better.

I'm 34 now and after 5yrs of 848/899, I'm super confident riding on mountain roads I know, but not so much on roads I've never been on. I'm sure the school will help with that.

You'll be fine with time. Keep the thing in Sport mode and work on the throttle control, apexing, corner speed, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'd like to chime in on the "take driving lessons advice". I've been riding for 12 years and I'm still learning. I watch this video at least a couple of times a year and I still find new things to practice on. You'll find a lot of good knowledge to keep in mind.

Twist of the wrist II by Keith Code, founder of California Superbike School.
Twist of the Wrist II - YouTube

Thank you. That helps a lot at least to start off things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My '09 848 was my first superbike :D I was 29 and hadn't ridden since I was 15 in 1995. I started off on Yamaha Jog scooters and went onto a Katana and a CBR before taking the long hiatus.

Don't be afraid to go fast and lean the bike in the turns, as mentioned, you push right to go left and vice versa at speed.

I have both of Keith Code's videos along with a suspension setup walk-thru video.

Since you already did the MST and have your full license, I would sign up for a riding school where you can use one of their bikes, typically a GSXR or a Ninja. Then you won't be worried about going down on your new 899.

Personally I've never done a formal class or weekend school. It comes quite naturally to me. I do plan on doing one though just to get better.

I'm 34 now and after 5yrs of 848/899, I'm super confident riding on mountain roads I know, but not so much on roads I've never been on. I'm sure the school will help with that.

You'll be fine with time. Keep the thing in Sport mode and work on the throttle control, apexing, corner speed, etc.
@ corvus . Like I said I have ridden bikes before for 10 years, but 100-150cc ones, I'm no stranger on a bike but starting to acknowledge and appreciate how different the 899 Panigale is compared to what I have ridden before. This thing feels closer to a spacecraft than a bike. None of my prior bikes had electronics controlling anything. But the laws of physics still apply. Slow speed turns aren't a problem since I have done that innumerable times on prior bikes. What's lacking is the fast corners, with the lean. Certainly didn't trust the prior bikes or the roads to do that before.


Appreciate all the input I have been getting here. I will watch the video enough number of times and try some of that , all within my comfort zone. I will definitely find time for formal lessons with training bikes. Last thing I want to do is lie down my panigale doing that. Speaking of which do you guys have frame sliders on your 899s or is pointless when laying down a imported engineering marvel like the 899.?
 
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