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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, like many of us owning a Ducati has been a dream of mine since I was a child, a red 999 to be exact. I just turned 24, and I believe I'm mature enough to own one. About a year ago was about to purchase a brand new 848, but was convinced to wait because there were rumors about a replacement coming out. Well, the 899 is out and I think it's time to jump on one. It will be my first bike, and now before everyone starts to dismiss the idea of an 899 as my first bike, I would like to argue a few points to consider.

I understand that starting on a slower/smaller bike makes more sense because of all the rookie mistakes, but lurking through the forums, I found an equal amount of riders argue the importance of self control regardless of what bike it is. My first car was a brand new 2006 M3, and while it was dumb of me to drive that as my first car, it did in fact make me a better driver. So I figured I could carry that logic over to a motorcycle. More importantly, starting off with the m3, I learned the importance of self control and not allowing my ego get the best of me. Again, carrying this logic over into riding a motorcycle.

While I never owned a motorcycle, I have ridden many of my friends 600's and never had a problem. I know I'm not the only one to think this, but riding a motorcycle came natural to me. I would appreciate if any of you Ducati vets could offer some advice or feedback to my train of thought. It would help if any of you have an 899 could personal insight on the bike itself as well. Thank you in advance!


-ucbound13
 

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im not here to start any conflicts so please don't take this as a personal attack.

your 24 and you THINK your mature.

and you say riding comes natural to you? then shouldn't you know driving a car is completely different from riding a motorcycle?

since this is your first bike, i know my first bike i made a lot of expensive mistakes, and it was only a 7k bike. for instance my first dropped bike was standing still. and the next one was when i was riding to a stop sign, pretty much at a complete stop. you drop the 899 and its gonna be even more expensive.

and yes im going to assume you have only ridden your friends bikes. riding a bike and owning one is very different. your gonna get horror stories on how a car just bumped my bike and it can actually destroy the motorcycle. this is a expensive bike, and more expensive to fix.

as far as controlling your ego, your gonna be safe, till the day ur ego/pride will get the best of you. its not if it ll come, its when it ll come.

for me riding that 650 first made me really appreciate the 899 more.

well with all of that said i wouldn't suggest u get a supersport ( not just the 899 )motorcycle as your first bike.

but I'm just an (beep beepen beep beep sitting behind a keyboard ) you can fill that in. and tell me to beep off, I'm buying it anyway.

she is a blast to ride on, i have never not smiled when i got off the bike.
and no more some1 telling u ur headlights broken cuz theres 2 high and 2 low beams
i don't think I've ever heard of someone riding ta 899 and not just like it but LOVE IT and you will too.

gl and ride safe with agatt
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not an attack at all man. I came here looking for honesty and get advice from experienced riders. So thank you!

I know the car and bike are very different, but I was saying how the M3 allowed me to learn a lot more than a honda would've for example. The m3 made me a better driver. I used to hit up the crest once a week, but that took time and practice.

Not planning on ever doing that with the bike right away, but I figured that since I started driving with an advanced car, that in turn made me a better driver, figured the bike would do the same.
 

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thank you for taking what i said objectively, also i forgot to add do not ride above your skill level, if your friends are going faster than you would like then they can go fast and wait for you sum where down the road, do not try to keep up.
 

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I agree with itzboo that you shouldn't start on a Ducati as you will probably drop it. You can't drop a car. It could be while your washing the bike or moving it around the garage, and when it happens its going to cost you $$$$$.

Bikes are different to cars. You will learn HEAPS more on a 250-300cc than you will on a 600, 750 or 1000. Not many people can push a 600 to litre bike to its limit. I know riders on 300cc bikes that can out ride most people on 1000cc. You can ride these bikes really aggressive and it teaches you the most important part of riding a bike and that is cornering & body position.

That said if you want a 899 then get it. It's your choice at the end of the day. But i would recommend you start studying the Cornering Bible and Twist of the Wrist 1&2. Also take advanced cornering classes. Bikes require alot more skill then cars.

You will feel more comfortable throwing around a cheap bike then a expensive superbike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thank you for taking what i said objectively, also i forgot to add do not ride above your skill level, if your friends are going faster than you would like then they can go fast and wait for you sum where down the road, do not try to keep up.
Absolutely! Thanks again for your input
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree with itzboo that you shouldn't start on a Ducati as you will probably drop it. You can't drop a car. It could be while your washing the bike or moving it around the garage, and when it happens its going to cost you $$$$$.

Bikes are different to cars. You will learn HEAPS more on a 250-300cc than you will on a 600, 750 or 1000. Not many people can push a 600 to litre bike to its limit. I know riders on 300cc bikes that can out ride most people on 1000cc. You can ride these bikes really aggressive and it teaches you the most important part of riding a bike and that is cornering & body position.

That said if you want a 899 then get it. It's your choice at the end of the day. But i would recommend you start studying the Cornering Bible and Twist of the Wrist 1&2. Also take advanced cornering classes. Bikes require alot more skill then cars.

You will feel more comfortable throwing around a cheap bike then a expensive superbike.
No arguing with that. Just to clarify, I don't think a good car driver necessary makes a person a good bike rider. What I meant is that the advanced car was a different learning experience, I just tried to follow that train of thought with motorcycles. But thanks again for the input. I've been looking into some cheap Kawasakis for a grand or two.
 

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I had a 600hp corvette. I agree you can learn a lot more with those types of cars than a civic. Having said that, it doesn't translate to motorcycles. You can make mistakes in a car and learn. You make a mistake on a bike and your likely in for a very expensive and painful lesson. Make these mistakes on something you can afford to repair. We aren't shooting you down saying you aren't mature enough. Its not about that. We believe you can handle it maturely, but there are simple mistakes that come with being a beginner. I have raced cars, had my vette up to almost 180mph, I'm a helicopter pilot, airplane pilot, ect. Point is, with all that experience of being good at **** I still made a few newbie mistakes. Luckily I started on a CBR 600 that cost me $4k. Was still a very nice bike. I was pushing it into a showroom where I kept it and as I went through the doorway I slipped and fell. Didn't realize those polished floors get so slick when wet. A thunderstorm came through and people going in and out drug water through the door. The bike fell over right in the doorway. Tank hit the door frame. Destroyed the gas tank. Now I know to pay close attention to your surface for slick areas. Glad I learned on a $4k bike, not a $17k bike. That was my only "crash". Glad I listened to folks and didn't buy something new. I sold that CBR, bought one a little newer. Sold that then bought a nearly new R6. Once I kept the R6 perfect for a few years I bought this 899. Its hard to take advice but I'm glad I waited til I'm 30 to buy the expensive stuff. Don't forget to factor in full coverage. Itll be a lot less for a cheaper bike. Only other thing I crashed was a helicopter but those things are impossible to land when something's mechanically wrong. But that's a story for another day. My .02 for whatever its worth.
 

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As others have already stated, you actually learn more on a smaller cc bike than with a bigger one. The main reason is that you pretty much get to use all of the capabilities of a small cc bike, whereas with a bigger cc bike you simply can't on a street. You have to shift more on a smaller cc bike, giving you tons of shifting practice. Smaller cc bike have narrower tires, allowing you to tip the bike easily in a turn, thereby giving you a good lesson in what a good turn should be.

If it has to be a Ducati, how about a Monster? It's about $5k cheaper, and doesn't have a whole lot of fairings that gets scratched up easily.
 

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My advice would be to buy something inexpensive and small. There are many aspects of riding which do not come naturally and must be learned. Consider a Honda Rebel 250 or a Ninja 250 and practice, practice, practice. You'll feel much more comfortable and relaxed on a bike that you're not to worried about scratching or denting up. I would also suggest reading "Proficient Motorcycling" to help you learn about riding and staying alive on the street. Finally, buy the best riding gear you can afford. Helmet, gloves, jacket, pants and boots. I prefer leather but there are many textile offerings as well. My motto is all the gear all the time.

Whatever you do have fun and be safe.
 

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A mistake in an m3 is different. In an accident , 9 out of 10 times your going to walk away unscathed . An accident on a high powered motorcycle the stats change . Please be careful.
 

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Not an attack at all man. I came here looking for honesty and get advice from experienced riders. So thank you!

I know the car and bike are very different, but I was saying how the M3 allowed me to learn a lot more than a honda would've for example. The m3 made me a better driver. I used to hit up the crest once a week, but that took time and practice.

Not planning on ever doing that with the bike right away, but I figured that since I started driving with an advanced car, that in turn made me a better driver, figured the bike would do the same.
So exactly how does an M3 make you a better driver than a honda? What if it's a fully built honda that's better than the M3? Just wondering
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I had a 600hp corvette. I agree you can learn a lot more with those types of cars than a civic. Having said that, it doesn't translate to motorcycles. You can make mistakes in a car and learn. You make a mistake on a bike and your likely in for a very expensive and painful lesson. Make these mistakes on something you can afford to repair. We aren't shooting you down saying you aren't mature enough. Its not about that. We believe you can handle it maturely, but there are simple mistakes that come with being a beginner. I have raced cars, had my vette up to almost 180mph, I'm a helicopter pilot, airplane pilot, ect. Point is, with all that experience of being good at **** I still made a few newbie mistakes. Luckily I started on a CBR 600 that cost me $4k. Was still a very nice bike. I was pushing it into a showroom where I kept it and as I went through the doorway I slipped and fell. Didn't realize those polished floors get so slick when wet. A thunderstorm came through and people going in and out drug water through the door. The bike fell over right in the doorway. Tank hit the door frame. Destroyed the gas tank. Now I know to pay close attention to your surface for slick areas. Glad I learned on a $4k bike, not a $17k bike. That was my only "crash". Glad I listened to folks and didn't buy something new. I sold that CBR, bought one a little newer. Sold that then bought a nearly new R6. Once I kept the R6 perfect for a few years I bought this 899. Its hard to take advice but I'm glad I waited til I'm 30 to buy the expensive stuff. Don't forget to factor in full coverage. Itll be a lot less for a cheaper bike. Only other thing I crashed was a helicopter but those things are impossible to land when something's mechanically wrong. But that's a story for another day. My .02 for whatever its worth.
This Helped a lot... Appreciate the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As others have already stated, you actually learn more on a smaller cc bike than with a bigger one. The main reason is that you pretty much get to use all of the capabilities of a small cc bike, whereas with a bigger cc bike you simply can't on a street. You have to shift more on a smaller cc bike, giving you tons of shifting practice. Smaller cc bike have narrower tires, allowing you to tip the bike easily in a turn, thereby giving you a good lesson in what a good turn should be.

If it has to be a Ducati, how about a Monster? It's about $5k cheaper, and doesn't have a whole lot of fairings that gets scratched up easily.

Appreciate the feedback. A monster is definitely an option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My advice would be to buy something inexpensive and small. There are many aspects of riding which do not come naturally and must be learned. Consider a Honda Rebel 250 or a Ninja 250 and practice, practice, practice. You'll feel much more comfortable and relaxed on a bike that you're not to worried about scratching or denting up. I would also suggest reading "Proficient Motorcycling" to help you learn about riding and staying alive on the street. Finally, buy the best riding gear you can afford. Helmet, gloves, jacket, pants and boots. I prefer leather but there are many textile offerings as well. My motto is all the gear all the time.

Whatever you do have fun and be safe.
Appreciate it! And yes, good gear is a must and my number one priority. I will take a look at the proficient motorcycling. I thinking about signing up for the advanced classes after taking that standard safety course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So exactly how does an M3 make you a better driver than a honda? What if it's a fully built honda that's better than the M3? Just wondering
Being exposed to the full potential of the vehicle, I knew what to expect and just set the standard higher with the whole driving experience. A well built honda wouldn't have done that, nor did one ever keep up with me in the canyons. The closest one got was an s2k, but when I drove it, the car didn't give me the confidence to assure me that it would drive the way the m3 did. Not bashing honda's, I'm just saying. A vehicle serving the purpose of be driven the way it was engineered like the m3, was what I thought I would be getting by getting a Ducati.
 
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