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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
New here My Name is Damion Dice (google me :). I just got an 899 and it was the best choice I have ever made in buying a motorcycle coming from a Cbr 600rr. What have you guys done to your bikes and what courses do you recommend to fully gain all the unlocks out this bike ?
 

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Welcome and congrats for your bike. This forum is not very active and you might not get many replies, in any case the bike is quite good in stock form, my suggestion is to use it as-is until you really need more. Since you bought it used, make sure maintenance was properly done and everything is in order. Also, set the suspension to its default settings (preload, compression and rebound, both front and rear) so you have a starting point, and make changes as you need.
A must-have, in my opinion, are aftermarket pegs (stock ones are very slippery), but I see you already have those, so you're good. Personal preference, I removed the evap canister and the flapper valve servo, as both do little other than being a potential source of trouble.
 

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heres my 2 cents

COSMETIC-remove passenger pegs,replace passenger seat with cowl,powder coat rear shock spring red to match wheels,white ducati reservoir socks.Lower radiator guard

MAINTENANCE-coolant flush and fill,brake fluid flush and fill,clutch fluid flush and fill,brake caliper washing/cleaning (see dave moss video) plus usual chain/engine oil change. Download and or print off Ducati factory service manual for reference.Be aware of what products to use and not to use on the matte white bodywork if its not to late from previous owner

PERFORMANCE- (as mentioned above) remove, throw out charcoal canister assembly and exhaust valve assembly.Upgrade air filter.K and N at the least.Rear preload,front preload ect ect (as mentioned above) ECU upgrade with rapidbike fuel controller at the least,Brentune if you can afford it. Slip on exhaust if you can afford it.If you cant,over the winter when the bikes in storage remove the stock muffler, and remove cat convertors and seal back up.Adjustable levers,gel grips
 

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Congrats on the 899! I purchased my first bike ever and first Ducati last year, Feb 2019. I was afraid from all the negative stories that the maintenance is a ***** and that a lot of things fail.

However, from my experience, I purchased the bike with 7400mi, and it's now at 15k miles. Lots of commuting to work and a few track days. AND NO ISSUES!

Recommendations:
  • GET THE RIGHT GEAR--2 piece suit or 1 full piece suit. Boots & gloves. If getting it brand new is too much, then do what I do, shop on: FB Marketplace, Craigslist, OfferUp, and/or eBay. I just purchased an Alpinestars Missile suit with the AirTech race bag for $1200 used. But the suit looked brand new. Also got the Supertech gloves and boots for around $500. Prior to that, I had a Dainese 2 piece suit also used. Pants were around $160 and jacket for $400. Point is, you can find amazing deals for quality gear that is used and save hundreds of dollars. But you'll have peace of mind that IF you do fall (God forbid) you'll be much safer than having just gloves, boots and a helmet. Look on some of those shock websites were people have lost limbs from low side crashes on the freeway. It's not worth your body or your life to cheap out on this!
  • Track days! I took some safety classes here in Cali, but when you go to the track, it's a whole different world. I first took CA Superbike School and they were amazing. They have an event calendar for all the locations they travel to. They are expensive ($500/day), but you learn the physics of the bike, they assign you and other students to a coach. The coach follows you around the track, then gives you advice on how to improve your riding. And you do this through out the day from 7am-5pm. I then took a few other track days from different schools that were less expensive, but it wasn't as in-depth as the 1st school. But it's all about practice, and at the other schools you can ask one of their staff coaches to follow you on the track and give you advice. This becomes an expensive hobby, but you can carry these skills over to road/street too.
  • Aftermarket clutch slave cylinder. If you've got some carpal tunnel like me, I'd highly recommend this! Makes shifting much smoother on the hand grip, and tolerable when you're on the streets. I purchased the Oberon model.
  • Aftermarket rearsets. I got this because I'm "short" for the bike (5'8"). You can easily adjust them, and they are much nicer than OEM. I purchased used Lightech rearsets, 5 stars!
  • Aftermarket handle grips. Pro Grip 717 GP Duo Density Race Grips
There's so much more you can purchase, but I think it's more for looks. The above list is just my 2 cents, but it's coming from a 1st time rider lol. So, you'll have more experience than me, and you'll probably be a faster learner when you hop on the track (if you haven't done so).
41064

41065

41063
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome and congrats for your bike. This forum is not very active and you might not get many replies, in any case the bike is quite good in stock form, my suggestion is to use it as-is until you really need more. Since you bought it used, make sure maintenance was properly done and everything is in order. Also, set the suspension to its default settings (preload, compression and rebound, both front and rear) so you have a starting point, and make changes as you need.
A must-have, in my opinion, are aftermarket pegs (stock ones are very slippery), but I see you already have those, so you're good. Personal preference, I removed the evap canister and the flapper valve servo, as both do little other than being a potential source of trouble.
Thanks a lot for the tips. I already have the sag adjusted to my height and weight being 6.2” that was must lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome and congrats for your bike. This forum is not very active and you might not get many replies, in any case the bike is quite good in stock form, my suggestion is to use it as-is until you really need more. Since you bought it used, make sure maintenance was properly done and everything is in order. Also, set the suspension to its default settings (preload, compression and rebound, both front and rear) so you have a starting point, and make changes as you need.
A must-have, in my opinion, are aftermarket pegs (stock ones are very slippery), but I see you already have those, so you're good. Personal preference, I removed the evap canister and the flapper valve servo, as both do little other than being a potential source of trouble.
What does the evap canister do and what does the flapper valve do ? What future problems do they pose ?
 

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What does the evap canister do and what does the flapper valve do ? What future problems do they pose ?
Evap canister is there to collect vapors from the gas tank when the bike is parked, so they get sucked into the engine at first start. It's known - on some bikes - to be a potential source of issues, especially at startup. On my own 899, the previous owner reported startup issues and the official Ducati dealership fixed them by bypassing the canister, but leaving it on the bike. When I bough it, I removed the canister completely, properly plugged the ports on the intake manifolds (stainless steel bolts, copper washers and red Loctite), removed the extra hoses, and re-routed the tank vents exactly like on EU bikes. Speaking of that: evap canister is a US-only requirement, motorcycles sold in the rest of the world (even in countries with strict anti-pollution laws) don't have it.

Flapper valve is there only to pass noise emission tests, partially restricting the exhaust at low RPMs. It's spring-loaded in the open position and cable-actuated, with the servo being hidden behind the lower radiator. It's one of those things that works well until it doesn't. Many people simply disconnect the cable from the valve, as it takes 5 minutes: the only downside of this method is that it triggers some errors in the ECU, but since they are not displayed in the dash (you can only see via MelcoDiag or other scanner), it's not really a problem. I personally removed the servo altogether and plugged a Vizi-Tec servo eliminator device, so my ECU is not complaining at all. Some even remove the flapper valve from the exhaust, but it's a non-reversible mod so I decided against it.
 
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