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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey there guys i need help i am trying to do my 600 miles oil changeon my 899 i went to the dealer where i purchased it they are crazy if they think i am going to pay $350 dollars for an oil change so i figured i would do it myself but i don't know what oil and how much would i be needing can anyone help me please thanks!
 

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They do more on the 600 mile service than just change the oil. I had some stuff vibrate loose and they went over the whole bike checking torque on stuff, plus software updates and resetting the service indicator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
THANKS I REALLY APPRECIATE IT.I had some shop tell me that i can get a check off list that i can do myself to check all the stuff that needs to be checked out but i don't know where to get that list either and i recently had a full check up on the bike and as for the service indicator they are charging me $10 which i don't see being a big deal but if i cant find out this info it would leave me with no choice but to pay those $350
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah i think that is going to be my best shot since i am new to riding this is my first bike i got it as a gift and i was shocked when they told me it was going to be $350 but oh well its got to be done anyway thanks a lot :)
 

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I think that's a good move, but please don't be discouraged from learning to work on your motorcycle. If you are competent with a wrench and can follow a procedure you can perform most of the basic maintenance that's required by yourself. Things like oil changes, brake pad changes and the such are not difficult, but they do require that you follow a proper procedure. Learn these things and you will become a better keeper of your bike.

Also, I've been on a kick about this lately, check your tire pressures before EVERY ride. Very small things can change your tire pressure enough to greatly impact how your motorcycle works. I say this because I had a friend contact me last weekend saying his bike was "handling funny". I told him to bring it over and the first thing we checked was tire pressure. The rear tire was at 50 PSI and the front was under 30. We set them to the proper pressures and the problem went away. We checked an hour later to make sure the front didn't have a leak (it didn't) and I sent him on his way.

Good luck with the new ride! That's a heck of a great gift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yeah i am actually that type of person i love learning new things and like working on my vehicles you are right :) thanks a lot for the info i really appreciate it

i know i am happy to say that at the age of 20 i owned a Ducati :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
haha i wish lol i pay for my insurance i am insured with state farm the same day i got my bike i got life insurance and full coverage insurance with state farm and I'm not going to lie to you i am paying $185 a month for life insurance and full coverage insurance with $500 deductible now that i cant complain about oh and i have no motorcycle license only car haha
 

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There's no reason you can't do the oil change yourself but it's still a good idea to have the shop do the rest of your 600 mile service. You can even buy the supplies from them and keep the receipts.
 

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life in cali must be good...$350 for the first service is almost 2x what i paid at my dealer, and $185 for insurance...ouch....$66/mo here, full coverage, $500 deductible
My insurance comes to $48 a month full coverage with $250 deductable but who cares? I'm sure someone else is paying less for more and some are paying more for less; such is life.
 

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The "list" you're referring to is in your owner's manual titled "Scheduled Maintenance Chart".
Just want to say that this is totally wrong. The dealers have a checklist of many very specific things they check way above and beyond the manual. I know so because they gave it to me with my receipt.
 

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I think that's a good move, but please don't be discouraged from learning to work on your motorcycle. If you are competent with a wrench and can follow a procedure you can perform most of the basic maintenance that's required by yourself. Things like oil changes, brake pad changes and the such are not difficult, but they do require that you follow a proper procedure. Learn these things and you will become a better keeper of your bike.

Also, I've been on a kick about this lately, check your tire pressures before EVERY ride. Very small things can change your tire pressure enough to greatly impact how your motorcycle works. I say this because I had a friend contact me last weekend saying his bike was "handling funny". I told him to bring it over and the first thing we checked was tire pressure. The rear tire was at 50 PSI and the front was under 30. We set them to the proper pressures and the problem went away. We checked an hour later to make sure the front didn't have a leak (it didn't) and I sent him on his way.

Good luck with the new ride! That's a heck of a great gift.
I had tire pressure monitor System installed on my 848evo. Luckely I did, because it warned me of a puncture....I transferred the system to my new 899...works great and it even informs you of the tire temperature, which can also come in very handy....

Look at: TireMoni TPMS — smart tyre pressure monitoring for fast and easy retrofit!
 

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Just want to say that this is totally wrong. The dealers have a checklist of many very specific things they check way above and beyond the manual. I know so because they gave it to me with my receipt.
I think that the workshop manual of the 899 can be aquired from this website some day soon.... DUCATI Manuals Resource
I reckon it will have the full list you referring to in it.....
 

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While we're on the subject of oil, I have a rather silly question. This is the first bike I've owned that has a 'sight window'. Normally, I check my oil after riding and the bike has sat for a bit. According to the manual, you're supposed to check the oil on these bikes when the bike is 'cold'. I noticed the other day, that I couldn't see a line in the window; which seemed to indicate that my oil level was low. However, when I turned the key to the 'on' position, the oil level magically appeared; presumably because the pump got turned on with the ignition. So, should the oil level be checked prior to turning the key or afterwards?
 

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While we're on the subject of oil, I have a rather silly question. This is the first bike I've owned that has a 'sight window'. Normally, I check my oil after riding and the bike has sat for a bit. According to the manual, you're supposed to check the oil on these bikes when the bike is 'cold'. I noticed the other day, that I couldn't see a line in the window; which seemed to indicate that my oil level was low. However, when I turned the key to the 'on' position, the oil level magically appeared; presumably because the pump got turned on with the ignition. So, should the oil level be checked prior to turning the key or afterwards?
Prior.
 

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[email protected]'s what I was afraid of. I guess it's time to pull the fairings and start looking for oil leaks...thanks for the info.
I've already read about serious oil consumption so it may not be a leak, or your dealer could have shorted the fill. Mine has the leak, and in over 3,000 miles it barely lowered the oil level at all.
 
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