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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One thing I am confused about is the numbering for EBC. If I wanted to prevent rear tire lockups from aggressive downshifting then I would go with EBC 2 or 3, or is it the opposite?

Thanks!
 

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The levels are:
OFF
1
2
3

OFF has no effect, so in essence you get the full engine braking that the engine has without any intervention from the electronics

1 gives a little bit less engine braking, and this is the DEFAULT level in all three riding modes

2 gives even less engine braking

3 gives the least amount of engine braking, and is a dramatic difference intended for racing/track conditions for riders who prefer a high-speed flowing cornering style (think Jorge Lorenzo). If the rider prefers to "square off" the corner a little and have the rear of the bike helping to turn the bike, then they would not want to use this high a level of EBC.

Please note that the differences are felt primarily at high RPM's and not lower basic street riding RPM's. My suggestion is when you are at the track, set race mode up with EBC off, take a few laps, come into the pits, set it to level 1, few more laps, level 2, etc. until you've tried all 3 so you can see the difference. I eventually preferred level 3 on my 1199 after some time, but at first I didn't like it because I was used to the engine braking from my 848 and had adapted my riding style to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The levels are:
OFF
1
2
3

OFF has no effect, so in essence you get the full engine braking that the engine has without any intervention from the electronics

1 gives a little bit less engine braking, and this is the DEFAULT level in all three riding modes

2 gives even less engine braking

3 gives the least amount of engine braking, and is a dramatic difference intended for racing/track conditions for riders who prefer a high-speed flowing cornering style (think Jorge Lorenzo). If the rider prefers to "square off" the corner a little and have the rear of the bike helping to turn the bike, then they would not want to use this high a level of EBC.

Please note that the differences are felt primarily at high RPM's and not lower basic street riding RPM's. My suggestion is when you are at the track, set race mode up with EBC off, take a few laps, come into the pits, set it to level 1, few more laps, level 2, etc. until you've tried all 3 so you can see the difference. I eventually preferred level 3 on my 1199 after some time, but at first I didn't like it because I was used to the engine braking from my 848 and had adapted my riding style to that.
I appreciate it!

I have a Yoyo slipper on my 675R track bike and I love how I can bang down 3 gears and not worry about the rear dancing around. I was hoping I could get to something near that level on the 899, so I think I will experiment with level 2 and 3.
 

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I appreciate it!

I have a Yoyo slipper on my 675R track bike and I love how I can bang down 3 gears and not worry about the rear dancing around. I was hoping I could get to something near that level on the 899, so I think I will experiment with level 2 and 3.
That's probably asking more than EBC can deliver, you'd be better off putting the mechanical slipper in the 899 as well. EBC is more subtle and is designed to help smooth out corner entry, not really to act like a slipper as a safety device to stop rear-wheel hopping on really aggressive downshifting.
 

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That's probably asking more than EBC can deliver, you'd be better off putting the mechanical slipper in the 899 as well. EBC is more subtle and is designed to help smooth out corner entry, not really to act like a slipper as a safety device to stop rear-wheel hopping on really aggressive downshifting.
Wouldn't the ABS at the right level be more of what he's asking? Of course a real slipper is better but how would that affect the operation of the ABS on our bikes?
 

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Wouldn't the ABS at the right level be more of what he's asking? Of course a real slipper is better but how would that affect the operation of the ABS on our bikes?
ABS has nothing to do with the slipper clutch, those are completely unrelated. Banging down 3 gears and dumping the clutch will put a lot of back torque through the drivetrain, and the slipper clutch would mitigate that by allowing the clutch plates to slip and keep all of the back torque from the rear wheel through the chain from being transmitted to the crankshaft. ABS is designed to keep the tire from locking up under braking forces only, if you're not stomping on the rear brake the rear ABS would never kick in.
 

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ABS has nothing to do with the slipper clutch, those are completely unrelated. Banging down 3 gears and dumping the clutch will put a lot of back torque through the drivetrain, and the slipper clutch would mitigate that by allowing the clutch plates to slip and keep all of the back torque from the rear wheel through the chain from being transmitted to the crankshaft. ABS is designed to keep the tire from locking up under braking forces only, if you're not stomping on the rear brake the rear ABS would never kick in.
I'm a dumb ass, I meant to say TC, not ABS :doh: lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is slightly disappointing. I thought EBC was essentially an electronic slipper. I may have to get one in this bike too.
 

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That is slightly disappointing. I thought EBC was essentially an electronic slipper. I may have to get one in this bike too.
Well try it first, you may find it does plenty for your riding style. I really does work well for what it's designed to do. But the question above about dropping 3 gears and dumping the clutch is something that only a true mechanical slipper clutch is going to handle.
 

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Makes sense tho the TC only works on acceleration just based on how it achieves what it does mechanically. Now way for it to change anything any other way with a manual trans and direct chain drive.

You know, since this new gen or Ducs has a gear indicator on the dash, it's too bad they don't rev match when down shifting like a sports car and have varying degrees of that which we can control...
 

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Makes sense tho the TC only works on acceleration just based on how it achieves what it does mechanically. Now way for it to change anything any other way with a manual trans and direct chain drive.

You know, since this new gen or Ducs has a gear indicator on the dash, it's too bad they don't rev match when down shifting like a sports car and have varying degrees of that which we can control...
Might happen at some point on production bikes, the technology already exists with aftermarket racing electronics.
 

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I thought the 899 has an electronic aid that blips the throttle when the bike senses rear tire drag. I think i read in a review that the rider felt uncomfortable because the aid would kick in when the bike was leaned over.
 

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I thought the 899 has an electronic aid that blips the throttle when the bike senses rear tire drag. I think i read in a review that the rider felt uncomfortable because the aid would kick in when the bike was leaned over.
No, there is not an auto-blip downshift function on any production motorcycle that I'm aware of. You can get aftermarket racing electronics systems that have it. I think you're just referring to EBC, as far as the aid that is intended to mitigate rear tire drag, and then confusing that with DTC which is something that might kick in when the bike is leaned over and you got on the throttle.
 

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So this is how ducati defines ebc

Engine Brake Control (EBC)

This system works to prevent and manage rear wheel lock during extreme downchanges. If the system detects rear wheel spin it sends a signal to the engine control unit, which slightly increases rpm until the rear tyre regains a speed matching that of the bike. The EBC has a 3-level operating system, and is integrated into the 3 Riding Modes.
 
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