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Discussion Starter #3
its cool, I understand the risks of going to the track, it just sucks balls when another rider plows you from behind causing you to high side getting a puncture wound from your foot peg on your right butt cheek lol, that **** hurt like mofo. I have low sided before with no injuries but at least crashing on my own. its the front straight so many ways to avoid the accident.

2 things I fear on the track, 1 is hitting someone and 2 is getting hit by someone lmao.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
by the way, anyone every get involved in a track accident with another rider either at fault or not?

I hope I don't make that error that will cause another rider to go down on the track, the feeling must also suck balls.
 

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Yeah, that's a bunch more clear and I agree.

I'll take the giant flying high side all day long over coming together with another bike and ending up in a tumble fest.

I've been fortunate - I've had a few "bumps" with other racers over the years, but have been lucky for that to never result in either of us falling down.

I had a pretty fast low side at Pikes Peak last year on the second lap and I was in a grip of traffic. I was really glad when I didn't collect anyone else.

glad to hear you're well enough to post here about it. Heal quickly :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks! feeling a lil better everyday, can't wait to get back still have a few months left off the season.

by the way the other rider fractured one of the bones on his spine and recovering but done for the rest of the season because he has to wear a back brace for a few months. I consider both of us lucky by not having any major surgeries just bruises and stiches.

thanks for sharing your experiences. anything that will in tune my mind in future code browns will help since this is something I will be doing for the rest of my life till I can.


Yeah, that's a bunch more clear and I agree.

I'll take the giant flying high side all day long over coming together with another bike and ending up in a tumble fest.

I've been fortunate - I've had a few "bumps" with other racers over the years, but have been lucky for that to never result in either of us falling down.

I had a pretty fast low side at Pikes Peak last year on the second lap and I was in a grip of traffic. I was really glad when I didn't collect anyone else.

glad to hear you're well enough to post here about it. Heal quickly :)
 

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yeah, i'm sorry to hear that man.

This is why i'm so hesitant to get on the track anymore. Seen quite a few crashes and near misses... and just like the street, you can't control what other ppl do...
 

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yeah, i'm sorry to hear that man.

This is why i'm so hesitant to get on the track anymore. Seen quite a few crashes and near misses... and just like the street, you can't control what other ppl do...
While you never can control other people, I'd argue taking it to the track is way safer...by miles...
 

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While you never can control other people, I'd argue taking it to the track is way safer...by miles...
I think this depends greatly on how you view the metric.

Raw number of accidents, number of accidents as a percentage of users, number if "injuries", number of fatalities, number of single vehicle accidents, number of multi vehicle accidents...

each of these metrics will produce a very different picture of the safety of the track versus the street.

In the end we each have to pick an acceptable "level of risk". To me the likelihood of me being in an accident that's my fault is higher on the track, but I choose to accept that risk. On the street I think my odds are much higher of coming together with a 6000lb un-guided missile as the person in the driver's seat will likely be texting when they hit me.
 

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neither are completely safe...but you're never alone when you do either.

accidents on both suck regardless...and are very possible.

but like rybo pointed out...there probably isn't a track day where someone doesn't fall...but I'm sure all of those riders have had street days where they haven't... it's all a gamble.
 

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To everyone's point, accidents are going to happen, but one advantage of track over street is that crashes are expected to happen and the tracks are designed to minimize rider/driver injury. Also those at the track have a much higher awareness of what can happen, and typically have higher-than-average skill. It's been my experience that there are always a few a$$hats who ride above their ability, but most of the time they manage to only take themselves out.
 

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To everyone's point, accidents are going to happen, but one advantage of track over street is that crashes are expected to happen and the tracks are designed to minimize rider/driver injury. Also those at the track have a much higher awareness of what can happen, and typically have higher-than-average skill. It's been my experience that there are always a few a$$hats who ride above their ability, but most of the time they manage to only take themselves out.
I ran track days in Colorado for about 5 years and would go for many events in a row without people crashing. Some of this was luck, some of this was good set-up, a lot of it was the availability of free coaching / instruction and a pretty good number of control riders / instructors that were authorized to pull people in and help them get their programs sorted out. In the course of my years doing it we only had one really serious accident, and it was fully the result of a good rider going out on an unknown bike and trying to go fast immediately. I can tell that story another time.

Part of the reason I really like the racetrack for my "go-fast" fun is that medical staff is on standby. I'm not competing with the 6 other car accidents in the metro area for an ambulance response, they are parked at the side of the track and can be on the scene in a matter of minutes (if not seconds).

Response time of Primary Care is one of the most critical elements in assuring the most positive outcome in trauma situations, and as such I view the racetrack as a superior environment.

There are some tracks operating today that choose not to have standby medical on-site while they operate, and I simply choose not to participate in those days.

In the end it comes down to the level of risk that we are each willing to accept and how we choose to manage that risk.
 

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I went down last year and broke a bunch of ribs. I couldn't move and had one **** of a time breathing. It seemed like I laid there a long time but I was told the EMT's took about 30 seconds to get to me. I don't think I'd ride on a track without an EMT on standby.
 

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I think this depends greatly on how you view the metric.

Raw number of accidents, number of accidents as a percentage of users, number if "injuries", number of fatalities, number of single vehicle accidents, number of multi vehicle accidents...

each of these metrics will produce a very different picture of the safety of the track versus the street.
I will argue no matter the metric you are using, track will always come out on top of street. Falling down at the track is kind of a given at some point since you are somewhat pushing the limits...but at the same time...if you are using the street as a track your risk is already higher out of the box as you deal with external factors such as gravel, oil, dirt, wildlife, cars etc.

The biggest safety feature on the track is run-off. You low-side on the street doing a 130 mph I can guarantee you your chances of coming out unharmed are pretty slim compared to doing the same thing at the track.

At the end of the day, I am more concerned about the "quality" of crashes rather than the quantity. I take crashing 10 times on the track and getting up unharmed over 1 time hitting the guardrail...

There is a reason why many people give up street riding after doing track days...
 

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if you are using the street as a track your risk is already higher out of the box as you deal with external factors such as gravel, oil, dirt, wildlife, cars etc.
Hence why I don't ride too fast in the street...

Response time of Primary Care is one of the most critical elements in assuring the most positive outcome in trauma situations, and as such I view the racetrack as a superior environment.
When I ride with my friends, we're usually out in Pennsyltucky. Who knows how long it would take for a helicopter or Ambulance to arrive...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I agree with the response time of the EMT there was a EMT vehicle on site and the 2nd EMT truck came in matter of minutes. not only that everyone at the track specially my home track are like family a few strays that ride above their skill level and endanger other riders like doing illegal passing on centain levels, stuffing, etc, but the control riders and coaches usually approach those riders after session and talk some sense to them to improve their riding skill, make em faster and safer on the track.

I definitely don't regret what happened just bummed have to wait to heal to ride again.
 

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I don't think I'd ride on a track without an EMT on standby.
Do any tracks operate without an EMT/ambulance on scene? I think for liability, they all have to have an EMT on premise? Sucks, cuz if someone goes down and is hurt bad enough that they have to be transported to a hospital, riding for the day has to stop until the ambulance gets back.

I've ridden at Robling Road in Savanah and this was the case there.

Speaking of which, I think the reason most of the time someone goes down on a track is because they're pushing it to hard on the track on "street" tires that get greasy and don't grip at temp like track tires do.

I think the corse tires OEM on the 899 are still street tires, but are acceptable for track use... no?
 

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Speaking of which, I think the reason most of the time someone goes down on a track is because they're pushing it to hard on the track on "street" tires that get greasy and don't grip at temp like track tires do.
Street tires like the RC2's are fine for track provided you don't over-ride their capability and that you are setting correct pressures for track use. My first 2 track days were done on RC2s and they were fine—I lowered their pressure (forget what the #s were). I've come close to low- and high-siding on slicks due to incorrect pressures resulting in the inability to maintain operating temps and improper suspension settings as well as bad body position.

There's number of common reasons that a rider may go down. A few that I'm familiar with are:

- Tight grip on bars when decelerating, accelerating, entering a turn, exiting a turn, citing bumpy stuff (happened to my buddy our last track day)
- Accelerating/decelerating while in transition from one lean angle to other (this can result in a high side)
- Accelerating too hard while leaned over on exit of a turn (low side)
- Abrupt change in speed while in turn (potential low side)
- Target fixation (in a turn will cause a ride to go wide and off track)

Be interested to se other common causes here.
 

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Street tires like the RC2's are fine for track provided you don't over-ride their capability and that you are setting correct pressures for track use. My first 2 track days were done on RC2s and they were fine—I lowered their pressure (forget what the #s were). I've come close to low- and high-siding on slicks due to incorrect pressures resulting in the inability to maintain operating temps and improper suspension settings as well as bad body position.

There's number of common reasons that a rider may go down. A few that I'm familiar with are:

- Tight grip on bars when decelerating, accelerating, entering a turn, exiting a turn, citing bumpy stuff (happened to my buddy our last track day)
- Accelerating/decelerating while in transition from one lean angle to other (this can result in a high side)
- Accelerating too hard while leaned over on exit of a turn (low side)
- Abrupt change in speed while in turn (potential low side)
- Target fixation (in a turn will cause a ride to go wide and off track)

Be interested to se other common causes here.


I think target fixation is the biggest one. When you get into a corner a little too hot the tendency is to chop the throttle which then stands the bike up and the rider panics and looks towards the outside edge to make sure he doesn't run off. I've caught myself doing that although I don't chop the throttle and refocus my attention down the track. I did a low side by using the brake too hard going into a corner and lost traction at the front.
 
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