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In my experience, I feel that some Italian bikes are Monday built and some bikes are Friday built
the bummers of globalism.

where are these bikes made again Thailand? just got my alpinestars and dainese kit. China and Africa?

It seems only 2 countries still make top stuff. Japan and Germany.

to OP: are there lemon laws for all this warranty stuff?
 

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the bummers of globalism.

where are these bikes made again Thailand? just got my alpinestars and dainese kit. China and Africa?

It seems only 2 countries still make top stuff. Japan and Germany.

to OP: are there lemon laws for all this warranty stuff?
The 899 is actually hand built in Italy, but the Scrambler was shifted to a plant in Thailand.
 

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ferntr33,my DP TCX race boots are "Made in Italy" but I agree most others are being increasingly made in countries with lower cost bases. My BMW race jacket was from Slovakia and still cost a fortune.
 

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I know many on this forum are diehard Ducati fans and my a have had many in the past and have become accustom to the "quirks".
I have tried to be optimistic and open to the Ducati experience, but I think I've come to the end of my rope. For the price you pay for these bikes, you expect a certain refinement; what I've found is the exact opposite. My realatively "cheap" Honda's have always been reliable in areas that are important; breaks, engine, transmission, and stability. This Ducati has been a nightmare. Oil leaks, break problems, starting issues, paint, suspension, and now transmission. When it comes down to it this bike just doesn't cut it. I can't understand why a new bike can have so many issues. I love the looks and the feel of the V-Twin, but that's it.
Mostly my complaints are mechanical, but when it comes down to it, I really think my CBR600RR was faster on the track. The bike doesn't have anything down low. and the CBR was much more composed in cornering.
If anyone would like details, just IM me. And if you're interested, I'm selling. Going back to Japanese (or possibly BMW).

Don't mind all the obnoxious fanboys. I too have owned several ducatis- 4 1199's now and I am finally done. I want to be able to take a weekend trip and not have to be scared of my Ducati breaking down like every single one has. I'm back on a s1000rr now and it is truly a different experience. Smooth as a baby's ass, all the power you'd ever want (understated vs Ducati overstating the **** out of their SBK's horsepower numbers), no constant downtime. No waiting two weeks for a single part to arrive at the shop. Just such a different experience. In enjoying every second of it. Of course the fanboys get al angry and call us butthurt. When we give any opinion of Ducati other than praise the fanboys panties get up in a bunch. I don't missed the ego of the 1199 crowd either....
 

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I have 65000 miles on a Yamaha FJR, 28000 on a Suzuki SV650 and 4300 on my 899. I have had 3 issues on the FJR that I was able to complete the trip because I was able to bypass switches( key switch) rewire connections(eliminating connectors) on the road. The sv650 rectifier died at 20000 miles. Luckily I was not on a trip it happened on my commute to work. So far no major issues with my 899. There were several BMW rear end problems on shaft driven bikes. My 1978 honda had timing chain adjuster issues. I do not know of a single manufacturer that I would say had zero trip interruptions on any bike.


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</thread>

Please move on...
 

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Many 899 riders are not "die hard Ducati people". Many people I've talked to that got the 899 had never owner a Ducati before (myself included). I also came from a CBR, and I think the 899 is better in every way. Ducati is selling more bikes than they ever have in the history of the company. The bikes may not suit everyone, but it would be hard to argue that they aren't appealing to a broader audience than they used to. Trust me, you can't hurt my feelings by not liking my bike, so no need to apologize. I'm riding it, not you, and I like it. That's all that matters to me.
 

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The 899 is actually hand built in Italy, but the Scrambler was shifted to a plant in Thailand.
I have just been on the Ducati factory tour in Bologna and I can assure you they are producing the Scrambler in Italy for the world market BY THE TRUCKLOAD. They are not producing Ducati anywhere else in the world at this moment according to the tour guide. Currently the Scrambler is their most produced model with the Multistrada a close second. This was also evident by the numerous models in various stages of completion around the factory.

I also read an article saying the Scrambler would be soon moved to production in Thailand, and the same article said the only components made in the Italian factory are the frame and the engine, and this is again total BS-as is the article. The frame is outsourced, the engine is built in house, but the only components manufactured in house are the crankshaft and camshaft. They are brought in as forged steel blanks and machined in house.

Sorry for the thread steal momentarily.

I had originally a Ducati 996 and totally understand the OPs POV regarding Ducati. Then I bought a 2010 M1100 and have had NO "Ducati" problems. I'm now looking for a 899, but debating waiting on the purchase to end of September when we have an idea of what changes will or won't be coming for the 2016 model.

Hope you get the trouble sorted out and fall back in love with the bike. Some of these issues that people have with Ducati's newer models can happen with any bike. Just having the Ducati name gives the problem a darker feeling, unless you change the way you look at it.
 

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I have just been on the Ducati factory tour in Bologna and I can assure you they are producing the Scrambler in Italy for the world market BY THE TRUCKLOAD. They are not producing Ducati anywhere else in the world at this moment according to the tour guide. Currently the Scrambler is their most produced model with the Multistrada a close second. This was also evident by the numerous models in various stages of completion around the factory.

I also read an article saying the Scrambler would be soon moved to production in Thailand, and the same article said the only components made in the Italian factory are the frame and the engine, and this is again total BS-as is the article. The frame is outsourced, the engine is built in house, but the only components manufactured in house are the crankshaft and camshaft. They are brought in as forged steel blanks and machined in house.

Sorry for the thread steal momentarily.

I had originally a Ducati 996 and totally understand the OPs POV regarding Ducati. Then I bought a 2010 M1100 and have had NO "Ducati" problems. I'm now looking for a 899, but debating waiting on the purchase to end of September when we have an idea of what changes will or won't be coming for the 2016 model.

Hope you get the trouble sorted out and fall back in love with the bike. Some of these issues that people have with Ducati's newer models can happen with any bike. Just having the Ducati name gives the problem a darker feeling, unless you change the way you look at it.

Well, there you have it..

I guess I was basing my information on one of several incorrect articles. I am glad that it seems I was right about the 899 and that the info about the Scrambler wasn't the other way around - it isn't in Thailand after saying that it was in Italy. Sometimes it is nice to be wrong!
 

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Thanks Juice/Ryder; I'll bleed it again, but I was pretty careful the first time. And I appreciate the constructive posts.

I love the people who will talk **** all day long in forums knowing they'll never have to back it up. Every forum has 'em.

bleeding the clutch will be a constant thing, the fluid in the slave cylinder is in direct contact with the engine, it gets hot and degrades rapidly, on the track i bleed it a bit every other weekend and for the street i would do it once a month
 

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hey everyone. just joined the site and wanted to discuss a few things that have gone wrong with my 2014 899. it has 10200 kms and has been in the shop 4 different times for broken parts and different issues. its in the shop now for a blow head gasket. 3 weeks ago the steering dampener broke and was leaking everywhere at the same time the kick stand had fallen off on the same ride.it was in the shop in the same this summer about 2 months ago for a blown radiator and the mirror fell off as i was riding because the bolts fell out. all of the heat shield glue and tape has come off around the exhaust under the tail becasue of excess heat i am assuming. have had nothing but problems with this bike and they are deciding what to do with the bike now. ducati america said they cant do anythign for me i must go through the dealer. i am not a happy camper and losing my mind. i look after this bike but also ride it as hard as it can be ridden on the street. it never gets an easy ride as thats what it is meant for. just wanted to share my experience with ducati and the bike so far.
thank you
 

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Dude I echo all the problems. As great as the bike is, my experience has just been horrific. Love the bike, but my next one will be japanese.
 
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