Ducati 899 Panigale Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, in looking to prep for the track i need to change out to water for the cooling system, i see the drain on the radiator on the left side, does anyone know of a drain for the coolant on the engine?? tks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
The drain on the side of the lower radiator will not drain enough of the fluid for a complete flush; use a fork oil tool and suck out the coolant from the bottom. Just went through this a couple of days ago with a Ducati mechanic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Ok, in looking to prep for the track i need to change out to water for the cooling system, i see the drain on the radiator on the left side, does anyone know of a drain for the coolant on the engine?? tks
This may be a silly question, but why? I've done a few track days, and that was never a requirement. Given how hot these bikes run, any worry about overheating; especially during the summer months?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This may be a silly question, but why? I've done a few track days, and that was never a requirement. Given how hot these bikes run, any worry about overheating; especially during the summer months?
because running in any class except novice requires water in the radiator, distilled water works better than actual coolant, the only reason to use coolant is so it doesnt freeze, distilled water and redline water wetter will result in lower temps than running normal coolant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
the track day provider in this area requires water in all classes but novice, no coolant allowed, if it spills its slippery
So is water, you'll go down just as quick from a leaky radiator spewing hot water as you will with it spewing hot coolant. Believe me, been there, done that! I think it's a stupid rule, put in place by people who blindly follow what the racing organizations do, without giving it much other thought. We allow alternate coolants at our track days, propylene-glycol based products such as Engine Ice. The reason is that those types of coolants will clean up from the track surface much easier than ethelyne-glycol based coolants will. If it spills, regardless of whether it's water or coolant, it's going to create a slick spot and any bike that hits it will have a problem, and the track will need to be shut down until it's cleaned up. The difference is that if you get the slimy green stuff on the track, the surface can be scrubbed off, but as the sun bakes on the track the coolant that absorbed in will continue to rise to the surface and create a slick spot all over again. The Engine Ice doesn't seem to do this, it's much more "watery" than the green stuff and once it's cleaned up the spot seems to be fine.

In my line of thinking, when people are going to a track day for fun and riding skill enhancement, you shouldn't require them to have their bike prepped the same way it would need to be for an AMA grid. We've always operated our track days that way with very few problems. We also don't have traditional "tech inspection" at our events, we use a "self-tech" process where we provide a checklist that you fill out certifying that you've checked over your bike and found it to meet the standards, and then you sign that and hand it in with your registration paperwork. My opinion is that no one should be more concerned with the mechanical state of the machine being ridden on the track than the person sitting atop it. It makes it MUCH simpler and easier for people to come enjoy our events without having a bunch of unnecessary bureaucracy in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So is water, you'll go down just as quick from a leaky radiator spewing hot water as you will with it spewing hot coolant. Believe me, been there, done that! I think it's a stupid rule, put in place by people who blindly follow what the racing organizations do, without giving it much other thought. We allow alternate coolants at our track days, propylene-glycol based products such as Engine Ice. The reason is that those types of coolants will clean up from the track surface much easier than ethelyne-glycol based coolants will. If it spills, regardless of whether it's water or coolant, it's going to create a slick spot and any bike that hits it will have a problem, and the track will need to be shut down until it's cleaned up. The difference is that if you get the slimy green stuff on the track, the surface can be scrubbed off, but as the sun bakes on the track the coolant that absorbed in will continue to rise to the surface and create a slick spot all over again. The Engine Ice doesn't seem to do this, it's much more "watery" than the green stuff and once it's cleaned up the spot seems to be fine.

In my line of thinking, when people are going to a track day for fun and riding skill enhancement, you shouldn't require them to have their bike prepped the same way it would need to be for an AMA grid. We've always operated our track days that way with very few problems. We also don't have traditional "tech inspection" at our events, we use a "self-tech" process where we provide a checklist that you fill out certifying that you've checked over your bike and found it to meet the standards, and then you sign that and hand it in with your registration paperwork. My opinion is that no one should be more concerned with the mechanical state of the machine being ridden on the track than the person sitting atop it. It makes it MUCH simpler and easier for people to come enjoy our events without having a bunch of unnecessary bureaucracy in place.
I guess, but my thoughts on that are, nothing cleans up as easy as water, and I leaves no residue, even PG will leave a slick spot for a bit. As for blindly following rules, Sportbike track time is one of if not the best track time provider in the nation, they must be doing something right, I've never seen anyone complain or not go to a track day because they had to take 20 minutes to change over to water. I personally like it, you drain it every winter for star age and every spring fresh water and water wetter goes in
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
I guess, but my thoughts on that are, nothing cleans up as easy as water, and I leaves no residue, even PG will leave a slick spot for a bit. As for blindly following rules, Sportbike track time is one of if not the best track time provider in the nation, they must be doing something right, I've never seen anyone complain or not go to a track day because they had to take 20 minutes to change over to water. I personally like it, you drain it every winter for star age and every spring fresh water and water wetter goes in
I remember one time in the past 3 years where we had a significant coolant spill on the track, running 25 track days a year. We've had way more oil spills than coolant spills. And oil is way harder to clean up, and every bike has it inside. I just think the concerns over coolant are overblown and I've taken the stance that I'm going to make it easier for the riders to get to the track and not worry about a very small likelihood of having a problem. To each their own. Nothing wrong with STT, I've riddedn with them many times, and will continue to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
This may be a silly question, but why? I've done a few track days, and that was never a requirement. Given how hot these bikes run, any worry about overheating; especially during the summer months?
The slick stuff they don't want on the track is Glycol which is to combat freezing (hence the name). All you really need for coolant is water. Water Wetter increases the cooling ability slightly by reducing surface tension (allowing full contact to the metal surfaces), I believe.

You don't want to be on the track after someone has emptied their reservoir of glycol based coolant. It happens (personal experience).

AND... water evaporates, glycol doesn't (at least not that day).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
The slick stuff they don't want on the track is Glycol which is to combat freezing (hence the name). All you really need for coolant is water. Water Wetter increases the cooling ability slightly by reducing surface tension (allowing full contact to the metal surfaces), I believe.

You don't want to be on the track after someone has emptied their reservoir of glycol based coolant. It happens (personal experience).

AND... water evaporates, glycol doesn't (at least not that day).
I thought that liquids with higher boiling points were more effective at cooling since they could absorb more energy (heat).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Boiling point elevation, yes. The mixture raises the boiling point to a degree which important if the system isn't able to stay under ~212F. After 212F the energy is put into phase change (liquid to gas). This would be okay other than the fact that you don't want gas (or the pressure increases that come with it) in your system. Anyway, I agree with AJ that it mostly has to do with clean-up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I remember one time in the past 3 years where we had a significant coolant spill on the track, running 25 track days a year. We've had way more oil spills than coolant spills. And oil is way harder to clean up, and every bike has it inside. I just think the concerns over coolant are overblown and I've taken the stance that I'm going to make it easier for the riders to get to the track and not worry about a very small likelihood of having a problem. To each their own. Nothing wrong with STT, I've riddedn with them many times, and will continue to do so.
It's not difficult to change out your fluids. I'd rather not have my track day ruined (let alone my bike) because someone was too lazy to make the swap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
It's not difficult to change out your fluids. I'd rather not have my track day ruined (let alone my bike) because someone was too lazy to make the swap.
Has nothing to do with being lazy, we still require coolant to be swapped out but we allow it to be replaced with Engine Ice rather than water so that it can be ran year-round since we're in an area where it gets below freezing for 4-5 months out of the year. Like I said before, you'll go down just as quick for a leaky radiator spewing hot water as hot Engine Ice. The reason we allow engine ice is that it's easier to clean up from the track surface than regular anti-freeze, according to the track marshalls at the tracks we run at, and so we agree to allow it.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top