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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a procedure w/ pictures to flush and replace the front & rear brake fluid? Normally this would be a pretty strait forward maintenance, but with the ABS module I'm not sure what's the best way. I'm also curious if the actual brake side of the system has the same 'black' fluid that we see in the reservoir.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not sure if anyone else noticed the same thing, but my brake fluid was very dark as well. When I bled the fronts, the fluid at the calipers looked brand new. Wierd.
Dido! Only the fluid up around the reservoir was dark. I think it's reacting with the reservoir tubing. I think you can get some clear stuff that doesn't sweat or react with the brake fluid.
 

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Agreed. Pretty simple. Just like 'non' ABS systems. Fill. Pump. Hold. Bleed. Repeat.

I use a one way check valve in line if the hoses off the bleeder valve so I don't really need to fiddle with the bleeder so much.

For the rear you'll need to remove the caliper and place an Allen key between the pads and flip the caliper upside down so the bleeder is at the highest most point. This prevents air from being trapped in the system. Air is lighter than fluid.

As for the rear fluid getting dark quickly is a result of its close proximity to the motor heat. It's being cooked essentially.


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So my next mod is Rizoma Reservoir. i knew a few guys here already have them on. so any help would be great. i won't have any issues putting them on. my main concern is the oil process. can someone please explain step by step on how to go about this?
do i need to force back the oil, bleed the master cylinder etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So my next mod is Rizoma Reservoir. i knew a few guys here already have them on. so any help would be great. i won't have any issues putting them on. my main concern is the oil process. can someone please explain step by step on how to go about this?
do i need to force back the oil, bleed the master cylinder etc.
I could be wrong but this is how I do it:
I clamp the hose just under the reservoir, swap, then release the clamp, fill the new reservoir and squeeze the hose a few times to push any air bubbles out that may have been trapped. I haven't had any issues so far (2 bikes with Rizoma upgrades).
No need to mess with the MC.
 

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I could be wrong but this is how I do it:
I clamp the hose just under the reservoir, swap, then release the clamp, fill the new reservoir and squeeze the hose a few times to push any air bubbles out that may have been trapped. I haven't had any issues so far (2 bikes with Rizoma upgrades).
No need to mess with the MC.
Yes my whole worry is getting bubble/air into the tube. Should this even be a concern? Last thing I need is my clutch/brakes not working because of air pockets. I was thinking of just pulling all the oil out, install reservoir, fill oil, and pull the oil again. But I heard once you pull oil, you must force oil back in. Which is something I want to avoid. I only have the tool to pull. And what about the master cylinder? Once you pull all the oil, does that automatic pull the oil out of the cylinder or is that separate?

Thanks for your respond Ashuskarde!
 

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Agreed. Pretty simple. Just like 'non' ABS systems. Fill. Pump. Hold. Bleed. Repeat.

I use a one way check valve in line if the hoses off the bleeder valve so I don't really need to fiddle with the bleeder so much.

For the rear you'll need to remove the caliper and place an Allen key between the pads and flip the caliper upside down so the bleeder is at the highest most point. This prevents air from being trapped in the system. Air is lighter than fluid.

As for the rear fluid getting dark quickly is a result of its close proximity to the motor heat. It's being cooked essentially.


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Why does the rear bleeder have to be higher than the reservoir?

That's not the case for front brakes nor clutch; they are both always higher than their respective bleeders.
 

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I doubt you'll get any answer on a thread that is older than 8 years.
In any case, forum member tkauftheil is not recommending to have the caliper above the reservoir, but to rotate the caliper in a way you have the bleeder at the top, so that air has an easy way out of the caliper. This is exactly what Ducati recommends in the Service Manual, when they instruct you to remove the caliper and free the brake line so that (I quote) "the caliper at the highest position possible (with bleeder up)".
 

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I doubt you'll get any answer on a thread that is older than 8 years.
In any case, forum member tkauftheil is not recommending to have the caliper above the reservoir, but to rotate the caliper in a way you have the bleeder at the top, so that air has an easy way out of the caliper. This is exactly what Ducati recommends in the Service Manual, when they instruct you to remove the caliper and free the brake line so that (I quote) "the caliper at the highest position possible (with bleeder up)".
Thank you.

Is it necessary to remove the rear wheel like the manual says?
 

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I was able to bleed and replace all the brake fluid in my bike without needing to remove the wheel or get the rear bleeder higher than the reservoir. All can be done with the standard method of “squeeze the lever, open the bleeder, close the bleeder, release the lever, repeat”.
 

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I was able to bleed and replace all the brake fluid in my bike without needing to remove the wheel or get the rear bleeder higher than the reservoir. All can be done with the standard method of “squeeze the lever, open the bleeder, close the bleeder, release the lever, repeat”.
You're not concerned about air getting trapped in the top of the caliper?
 

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You're not concerned about air getting trapped in the top of the caliper?

Nope. For All cars and bikes that I’ve bled over the years… not one had the caliper above the reservoir. Never had an issue. and I don’t see how taking the wheel off helps you bleed the brakes. If anything it makes the job harder… if you remove the wheel you remove the brake disc. With the disc removed the calipers will compress the pads together and make it nearly impossible to reinstall the wheel.
 

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Nope. For All cars and bikes that I’ve bled over the years… not one had the caliper above the reservoir. Never had an issue. and I don’t see how taking the wheel off helps you bleed the brakes. If anything it makes the job harder… if you remove the wheel you remove the brake disc. With the disc removed the calipers will compress the pads together and make it nearly impossible to reinstall the wheel.
Ari is a good resource
 

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Nope. For All cars and bikes that I’ve bled over the years… not one had the caliper above the reservoir. Never had an issue. and I don’t see how taking the wheel off helps you bleed the brakes. If anything it makes the job harder… if you remove the wheel you remove the brake disc. With the disc removed the calipers will compress the pads together and make it nearly impossible to reinstall the wheel.
Service Manual for the 899 explicitly recommends removing the rear wheel, so you can easily free the brake line from its clamps, remove the caliper and rotate it in a way to have the bleeder at the top. A spacer (Allen keys are commonly used because you can pick the exact size) inserted between the pads will keep the pistons in during the bleed.
Having said that, I do agree that the common method of opening/closing the bleeder while applying pressure at the pedal or lever, if done properly, is likely to be enough: if the fluid moves quickly enough, it will take any air bubbles with it, and force them out of the system regardless of the orientation of the components. Just be aware this is not what Ducati suggests for the 899.

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Service Manual for the 899 explicitly recommends removing the rear wheel, so you can easily free the brake line from its clamps, remove the caliper and rotate it in a way to have the bleeder at the top. A spacer (Allen keys are commonly used because you can pick the exact size) inserted between the pads will keep the pistons in during the bleed.
Having said that, I do agree that the common method of opening/closing the bleeder while applying pressure at the pedal or lever, if done properly, is likely to be enough: if the fluid moves quickly enough, it will take any air bubbles with it, and force them out of the system regardless of the orientation of the components. Just be aware this is not what Ducati suggests for the 899.

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The manual also mentions to remove the front caliper and compress the pistons. I am assuming this is to remove the old fluid trapped in the ABS system.

You think it's necessary? Because that sounds like a project.
 

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The reason why they recommend compressing the pistons and sucking the existing fluid from the reservoir before starting the bleed, is to reduce the amount of old fluid in the system and making the flush more effective. Is it strictly necessary? No, but you will get a much better flush this way: with the bleeder on the banjo bolts like it is on the 899's front calipers, any fluid behind the pistons will not get refreshed. Pushing the pistons all the way in minimizes such fluid.
 
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